Human foetus in the amniotic sac . At 33 weeks they are able to show the rooting reflex by turning their head and opening their mouth to respond to stimulation of the cheek. They are also practising sucking and swallowing.

Week 33

Mum

It’s time to feel big, fat and beautiful. Your baby is fully developed and growing rapidly in your womb. Remember to rest plenty – after all, you’re not doing it for yourself, you’re doing it for your child.

Your uterus is pushing against all your vital organs, making you short of breath. You may also experience heartburn and back pain. Pregnancy hormones are busy loosening your joints and ligaments in preparation for birth. This can make you less stable on your feet (you have stopped wearing high heels, right?) and cause pain when you move, bend, or pick up things.

Dad

You may not need to touch the bump in order to notice it move. Or lurch. Or roll. No doubt about it, it’s a real baby in there. A quick checklist for you: Baby car seat installed? Baby’s room insulated and painted? Baby clothes, washed and folded and put away?

The first few months with a newborn will be hectic. If you know your way around the kitchen, whip up a few casseroles and freeze them in dinner-sized portions. She will thank you when the baby’s here.

Baby

You are the size of a pineapple. Although your skeleton is hardening, the bones in your head won’t fuse together, in order to make your journey through the birth canal easier.

Photos in the bumpandbaby.co.nz/week-by-week/ are by Lenart Nilsson. Lenart's series was bought to fame when his photo, considered the greatest photo of the 20th century, appeared on the cover of Life magazine in 1965. “Everyone interprets images differently, depending on their social, cultural and religious background. In the digital era, I believe it is more important than ever to go back and take a look inside ourselves. What better way of doing that than with these photos?” ~ Jane Stene, art gallery director and curator of Lenart's definitive black and white series, told the The Guardian in 2019. It is Lenart Nilsson's wish that his images are never used for political debate about pro-life.

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